Do Goldendoodles Bark a Lot? What You Should Know!


Dr. Paola Cuevas Photo


Reviewed & Fact-Checked By

Dr. Paola Cuevas

Vet, MVZ

The information is current and up-to-date in accordance with the latest veterinarian research.


Learn more »

Goldendoodles are adorable poodle–golden retriever mixes endowed with the best traits of both breeds. They’re intelligent, athletic, loyal, and practically hypoallergenic. They’re considered designer dogs since each parent is a purebred from a different species. Goldendoodles combine the intelligence and athleticism of Poodles with the loving, family-oriented nature of Labradors, making them just about the perfect dogs.

They tend to be quite athletic and thrive in active families that enjoy hiking and exploring the great outdoors. These dogs come in various sizes, weighing anywhere from 15 to 100 pounds. Goldendoodles actually don’t bark that much. In fact, they’re known as one of the breeds least likely to engage in excessive vocalization. But sometimes, even the mellowest Goldendoodle gets a bit worked up and unleashes a string of barks.

divider-paw

But Don’t Poodles Bark a Lot?

While Poodles, particularly toy poodles, have a reputation for being excitable, with a tendency to bark a lot, Goldendoodles, by and large, don’t have this particular trait. Unlike Poodles, Labrador Retrievers tend to be mellow, often becoming depressed and withdrawn when not getting enough human attention. Goldendoodles have personalities more in line with their retriever genes regarding vocalization. They’re smart, like poodles, but mellow, like retrievers. Goldendoodles don’t bark that much, if at all.

Why Do Goldendoodles Bark?

Goldendoodles can be a bit territorial, but not excessively so. While not aggressive, they often bark to let interlopers of all sorts know the area has already been claimed. Some Goldendoodles bark when they hear a person or animal approaching the front door, while others simply ignore the intrusion.

There are many ways to get territorial dogs to mellow out a bit, from desensitization training to anxiety reduction techniques. But in general, Goldendoodles are one of the least likely breeds to engage in excessive barking. They’re not predisposed to pack-based howling or excitement-based barking like Beagles and Dachshunds.

goldendoodle on the grass
Image Credit: Rena Schild, Shutterstock

Why Do Dogs Bark?

Barking is part of being a dog. It’s a primary means of canine communication. But too much barking can become problematic as the noise, if uncontrolled, can be unpleasant for neighbors. While it’s never possible or desirable to prevent barking, there are ways to limit its duration and intensity. The first step is determining why your dog is barking!

Dogs bark for various reasons, including out of territoriality and boredom. They also bark when playing and when suffering from separation anxiety. If your dog barks out of boredom or loneliness when you leave, a food-dispensing toy can help by keeping your buddy busy for a few hours while you’re gone. You might also consider hiring a dog walker to give your pet a few minutes of attention if you’re regularly gone for more than 6–8 hours.

Dogs suffering from separation anxiety are notorious for barking and howling when left alone. Affected dogs often pace, go to the bathroom in the home and become destructive. Separation anxiety is a painful condition in which a dog suffers a severe panic attack when left alone by its caretaker. It’s relatively common, but certain breeds, such as Labrador Retrievers and Border Collies, are predisposed to developing the condition. No one is sure what causes dogs to develop separation anxiety, but it occurs more often in animals abandoned or relinquished by prior owners.

Mild separation anxiety can often be addressed with counterconditioning—convincing your dog to associate being alone with a yummy treat, for instance. Food puzzles that require a bit of work and release treats over time work well for counterconditioning. More serious separation anxiety often involves a combination of medication and behavioral therapy.

Dogs tend to bark a lot and become destructive when their mental or physical needs aren’t met. Super intelligent dogs, like Poodles, need mental stimulation, or they often become neurotic and quite vocal. Dogs that require a ton of exercise, like Huskies, sometimes vocalize excessively and become destructive if not provided with sufficient outlets for their energy.

goldendoodle walking
Image Credit: Jennifer McCallum, Shutterstock

How Do You Get a Goldendoodle to Stop Barking?

It’s entirely possible to end territorial barking, the kind associated with barking at unknown dogs and visitors. Positive reinforcement provides the best results. Begin by teaching your dog to respond to the command “Quiet.” Say “Quiet” as soon as your dog starts barking, and then do nothing until they stop. When your dog stops barking, give them a treat and praise. Most dogs learn to respond to the “Quiet” command relatively quickly.

Anxious dogs are more inclined to excessive vocalization, and lowering your dog’s anxiety level is also key to supporting your pet’s overall mental and physical health. Exercise is a cheap, proven, and fun way to reduce canine anxiety. Taking a dog for a walk in the morning can go a long way toward reducing their overall anxiety level. Seriously stressed dogs often benefit from having a safe place—a room they can retreat to when overstimulated, afraid, or uncomfortable. Music designed specifically for dogs is a promising non-pharmaceutical stress-reducing option.

divider-dog

Final Thoughts

Goldendoodles bring together the best characteristics of two popular breeds: Poodles and Golden Retrievers. These shaggy dogs have the intelligence and athleticism of poodles and the loving natures of labrador retrievers. They’re nearly hypoallergenic, making them just about the perfect pets. They come in all sizes and have hair that varies from straight to wavy, depending on their ancestry. Goldendoodles are guaranteed to steal your heart.


Featured Image Credit: anetapics, Shutterstock



Source link

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

UphillPets - Commissions for a cause!
Logo
Register New Account
Compare items
  • Total (0)
Compare
0
Shopping cart